Dae Young Kim

Dae Young Kim

Dae Young Kim

Associate Professor

Sociology: Immigration, ethnicity, race, Asian American studies, and globalization

Dae Young Kim is Associate Professor of Sociology in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at George Mason University.  He received his B.A. in Sociology and Spanish from SUNY-Binghamton and his Ph.D. in Sociology from CUNY Graduate Center.  His articles and book chapters on immigrant integration, particularly the integration of children of immigrants, have appeared in the Sociology of Religion, International Migration Review, Ethnic and Racial Studies, and Sociological Forum

In the book entitled, Transnational Communities in the Smartphone Age: The Korean Community in the Nation’s Capital (2018, Lexington Books), he examines the cross-border connections immigrants maintain with the home country, focusing in particular on the role information and communication technologies (ICT) and transnational media play in maintaining cultural and social life with the homeland.

Dr. Kim is currently working on a new research study entitled, "The Diffusion of Korean Popular Culture in the United States," which seeks to examine the growing popularity of Korean popular culture beyond co-ethnic and pan-Asian communities.

Current Research

Selected Publications

Book

Kim, Dae Young.  2018.  Transnational Communities in the Smartphone Age: The Korean Community in the Nation’s Capital.  Lexington Books.

Kim, Dae Young.  2014.  “Coping with Racialization: Second-Generation Korean-American Responses to Racial Othering,” in Pyong Gap Min (Ed), Younger-Generation Korean Experiences in the U.S. and Canada.  Lexington Books.

LFB book coverKim, Dae Young.  2013.  Second-Generation Korean Americans: Their Struggle for Full Inclusion.  LFB Scholarly Publishing.

Kim, Dae Young.  2011.  “The Pursuit of Elite High Schools and Colleges among Second-Generation Korean Americans.”  Development and Society 40(2): 225-259.

Courses Taught

SOCI 120 Globalization and Society

SOCI 303 Sociological Research Methodology

SOCI 308 Racial and Ethnic Relations

SOCI 330 U.S. Immigrants and Immigration

Dissertations Supervised

Felicia Garland-Jackson, Missing Voices: Participants' Narratives of the National Park Service's Summer in the Parks Program [1968-1976] (2018)

Ann Johnson, A Right-to-Work Model, the Unionization of Fairfax County Government Workers (2017)

Abigail Reiter , Racialized Microaggressions, Internalized and Intersecting Oppressions, and Identity Negotiation among Students of Color at a Predominately White University in the US Southeast (2016)